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Canon EF-S to EF Lens Conversion Chart

If you have a Canon crop sensor camera like a Canon 70D or Canon 90D, then you might be aware that there is a crop factor applied to all the lenses that you use on it. 

You can use both EF-S lenses as well as EF lenses on Canon DSLRs with the EF-S mount.

With either type of lens the crop factor will be the same either way.

The crop factor for Canon crop sensor DSLR cameras is 1.6x.

One example is if you had a 50mm lens on a Canon crop sensor DSLR, the equivalent focal length will be more like 80mm on full frame camera. 

Since it can be hard to do maths on the fly, we’ve created a handy chart for some common focal lengths used in lenses.

Use the chart below to see what the equivalent focal length would be in its full frame equivalent once you have applied the crop factor multiplier of 1.6x.

EF-S Full frame equivalent (EF)
10mm16mm
12mm19.2mm
16mm25.6mm
17mm27.2mm
18mm28.8mm
20mm32mm
22mm35.2mm
24mm38.4mm
35mm56mm
40mm64mm
50mm80mm
55mm88mm
60mm96mm
70mm112mm
85mm136mm
100mm160mm
105mm168mm
135mm216mm
200mm320mm
300mm480mm
Canon EF-S to EF Conversion Chart

For example, if you look at a 85mm on the EF-S column, you can see that the focal length will be equivalent to 136mm instead.

You could also use the chart to go backwards.

For example, if you like the look of 35mm on a full frame camera check for the closest focal length in the chart – in this case it would be the 35.2mm.

The corresponding DX focal length is 22mm so you know that if you want your focal length to look like a 35mm full frame then 22mm is a good focal length to go for.

If you want the exact focal length then just do the following:

To find the full frame equivalent focal length of a EF-S lens just multiply by 1.6.

To go backwards and find the EF-S lens that is closest to the EF focal length you like the look of, take the EF focal length and divide it by 1.6.

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